Reunion 2018 Schedule of Events

Contact

Director of Alumni Relations

E-mail Dania

914.813.9212

Below is a tentative schedule of events for Reunion 2018. A full schedule will be made available before registration opens in March.

Please note this schedule is subject to change.


Thursday, June 7

Registration in the Siegel Center

3 - 7 p.m.

Welcome Seminar & Sandwich Supper

Can Education Be Democratic?
Michael Davis, Philosophy Faculty
6:30 – 8:30 p.m.


Friday, June 8

Registration in the Siegel Center

8 a.m. - 7 p.m.

Morning Seminars

9:30 - 11 a.m.

Democracy and Education: John Dewey and Progressive Education—Barbara Schecter ’74, Director, Graduate Program in Child Development/Psychology

This seminar will discuss selected excerpts from Dewey's 1916 classic book Democracy and Education.  We will consider the significance of Dewey's ideas for contemporary challenges in progressive education, including values of socioeconomic and cultural diversity. We will also consider how we embrace values of progressive education here at Sarah Lawrence, and how these values manifest in the current educational climate.

Digital Disruptions—Michael Siff (Computer Science)

From the rise of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin to the promise and peril of Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs), computer networks are rapidly the changing the way we live and learn and not always for the better. In this reunion seminar, we will discuss six important principles of digital computing and how they play an ever-more "disruptive" role in society. We will focus our discussion on recent events such as "Fake News" on Facebook, the downfall of net neutrality, privacy in the age of the Amazon Echo, and advances in autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence.

Global Intertextualities—Bella Brodzki ’72 (Literature)

Seminar description will be posted shortly.

Race, Education & Democracy: The Howling Gap between New Deal Citizenship and the Raw Deal for Black America—Komozi Woodard (History)

Sadly, New York City began the 20th Century with an anti-black race riot in 1900 and the exhibit of Ota Benga, a Congolese man, in an animal cage at the Bronx Zoo in 1906. By the 1940s, Jim Crow racism developed into such a major organizing principle in American society, economy and polity that in the construction of New Deal Citizenship, African Americans were stigmatized by the segregated Raw Deal, excluding them from the GI Bill and higher education. How can educators overcome that undemocratic legacy of inequality? What are alternative organizing principles for rethinking race, education and democracy in the 21st Century?

Money Stories—Georgia Lee Hussey ’01

The stories that make up our lives are historical, political, social, romantic, and spiritual. They are also financial. But our culture’s inability to speak openly about money leaves many of us with dissonant money stories about starving artists, silver spoons, and spendthrifts. These clichés fail to teach us how to be our better selves. Discovering and reshaping our unique stories can be the gateway to imagining the possible. This seminar is an opportunity to connect with fellow SLC alumni in a guided, confidential conversation about money. We will discover and share our money stories and, in the process, learn about ourselves and our communities. Our conversation will focus on the questions: Is there a responsibility associated with wealth? What could it look like?  Georgia Hussey ’01 founded Modernist Financial in 2015 with the mission of fostering greater money awareness in her community and beyond. 

Thinking like a Poet: The Power of the Image—Suzanne Gardinier (Poetry)

In this workshop we'll take some time to explore what it means to think like a poet: to think in terms of images and the links between them, in complement to reason. We'll take the first part of our time to read radiant examples, the second part to do some writing exercises together. All are welcome: no previous experience in departure from reason required.

Self–Portrait: Materials and Meanings—John O’Connor (Visual and Studio Arts)

In this mixed media workshop, participants will explore the concept of point of view through the self-portrait. We will begin by looking at a selection of art historical examples of these portraits and discuss the many ways in which artists have utilized the self as a subject, as a means to experiment with materials and with modes of representation. An open-ended prompt will be given after this discussion, and participants will make self-portraits with the materials provided, in any style they like. We will discuss these works as a group at the conclusion. How and why do we draw and paint ourselves, and how does our unique point of view affect these images?

Making Sense of #MeToo: A History of Women and Activism—Lyde Cullen Sizer (History and Women’s History)

In 2006, in support of minority girls and women who have been the victims of sexual harassment and assault, activist Tarana Burke created the Me Too movement. Eleven years later actress Alyssa Milano made #MeToo an internet hashtag in the wake of allegations against Harvey Weinstein and other major public figures in entertainment and politics. Activism around #MeToo dominated the 75th Golden Globes as I write. What will happen next is anyone's guess. The question we begin with, here, is how this movement connects with previous mainstream efforts to draw attention to the ways women and girls have been diminished, traumatized and derailed by acts of both harassment and assault. We will read activists and analyze materials from the Second Wave, the Third Wave, and the current movement to think through the strategies and tactics of each, and what challenges arise from coming together as women despite profound differences in class, race, age, sexuality and experience. 

Dance Workshop—John Jasperse ’85, Director, Dance Program

Morning only

Seminar description will be posted shortly.

Luncheons

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

  • 50th Reunion Lunch with President Cristle Collins Judd
    for the class of 1968 and beyond
  • Reunion Lunch under the Tent
    for all other classes

Local Tours

1:45 - 4 p.m.

Tour of the Sarah Lawrence College Center for the Urban River at Beczak

Explore the College’s academic research facility on the banks of the Hudson River at Habirshaw Park. The center features a welcoming riverfront lawn, an easily accessible tidal marsh, and a beach used for river exploration and seining. SLC CURB provides a broad educational platform, establishes a Hudson River research program, and incorporates service learning and citizen science projects in the Yonkers community.

Tour of the Edible Academy at the New York Botanical Garden with Annie Novak ’05

Annie Novak ’05, manager of the Edible Academy, will explain the broad range of educational programs and hands-on activities of the immensely popular edible gardening program at The New York Botanical Garden, which will soon be able to extend its impact and greatly broaden its reach through the new Edible Academy, opening June 14th of 2018. Recognized as a leader in garden-based education for schools, families, and community groups, the NYBG has found that demand for such programs far exceeds current capacity. Creation of a three-acre state-of-the-art complex will enable the Edible Academy to offer life-changing opportunities and share the important connections between plants, gardening, nutrition, and healthy living—the foundation of the food-to-table movement. With the facility’s expansive new indoor and outdoor spaces, and through an increased and broadened range of educational programs and hands-on activities, the Garden will be able to offer year-round programming and double those served from 40,000 to 80,000 visitors a year.

Afternoon Seminars

2 - 3:30 p.m.

Democracy and Education: John Dewey and Progressive Education—Barbara Schecter ’74, Director, Graduate Program in Child Development/Psychology

This seminar will discuss selected excerpts from Dewey's 1916 classic book Democracy and Education.  We will consider the significance of Dewey's ideas for contemporary challenges in progressive education, including values of socioeconomic and cultural diversity. We will also consider how we embrace values of progressive education here at Sarah Lawrence, and how these values manifest in the current educational climate.

Digital Disruptions—Michael Siff (Computer Science)

From the rise of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin to the promise and peril of Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs), computer networks are rapidly the changing the way we live and learn and not always for the better. In this reunion seminar, we will discuss six important principles of digital computing and how they play an ever-more "disruptive" role in society. We will focus our discussion on recent events such as "Fake News" on Facebook, the downfall of net neutrality, privacy in the age of the Amazon Echo, and advances in autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence.

Global Intertextualities—Bella Brodzki ’72 (Literature)

Seminar description will be posted shortly.

Race, Education & Democracy: The Howling Gap between New Deal Citizenship and the Raw Deal for Black America—Komozi Woodard (History)

Sadly, New York City began the 20th Century with an anti-black race riot in 1900 and the exhibit of Ota Benga, a Congolese man, in an animal cage at the Bronx Zoo in 1906. By the 1940s, Jim Crow racism developed into such a major organizing principle in American society, economy and polity that in the construction of New Deal Citizenship, African Americans were stigmatized by the segregated Raw Deal, excluding them from the GI Bill and higher education. How can educators overcome that undemocratic legacy of inequality? What are alternative organizing principles for rethinking race, education and democracy in the 21st Century?

Money Stories—Georgia Lee Hussey ’01

The stories that make up our lives are historical, political, social, romantic, and spiritual. They are also financial. But our culture’s inability to speak openly about money leaves many of us with dissonant money stories about starving artists, silver spoons, and spendthrifts. These clichés fail to teach us how to be our better selves. Discovering and reshaping our unique stories can be the gateway to imagining the possible. This seminar is an opportunity to connect with fellow SLC alumni in a guided, confidential conversation about money. We will discover and share our money stories and, in the process, learn about ourselves and our communities. Our conversation will focus on the questions: Is there a responsibility associated with wealth? What could it look like?  Georgia Hussey ’01 founded Modernist Financial in 2015 with the mission of fostering greater money awareness in her community and beyond. 

Thinking like a Poet: The Power of the Image—Suzanne Gardinier (Poetry)

In this workshop we'll take some time to explore what it means to think like a poet: to think in terms of images and the links between them, in complement to reason. We'll take the first part of our time to read radiant examples, the second part to do some writing exercises together. All are welcome: no previous experience in departure from reason required.

Self-Portrait: Materials and Meanings—John O’Connor (Visual and Studio Arts)

In this mixed media workshop, participants will explore the concept of point of view through the self-portrait. We will begin by looking at a selection of art historical examples of these portraits and discuss the many ways in which artists have utilized the self as a subject, as a means to experiment with materials and with modes of representation. An open-ended prompt will be given after this discussion, and participants will make self-portraits with the materials provided, in any style they like. We will discuss these works as a group at the conclusion. How and why do we draw and paint ourselves, and how does our unique point of view affect these images?

Making Sense of #MeToo: A History of Women and Activism—Lyde Cullen Sizer (History and Women’s History)

In 2006, in support of minority girls and women who have been the victims of sexual harassment and assault, activist Tarana Burke created the Me Too movement. Eleven years later actress Alyssa Milano made #MeToo an internet hashtag in the wake of allegations against Harvey Weinstein and other major public figures in entertainment and politics. Activism around #MeToo dominated the 75th Golden Globes as I write. What will happen next is anyone's guess. The question we begin with, here, is how this movement connects with previous mainstream efforts to draw attention to the ways women and girls have been diminished, traumatized and derailed by acts of both harassment and assault. We will read activists and analyze materials from the Second Wave, the Third Wave, and the current movement to think through the strategies and tactics of each, and what challenges arise from coming together as women despite profound differences in class, race, age, sexuality and experience. 

Trump’s Economy: Mathematics and Visual Art—Frank Roosevelt, Economics Faculty Emeritus

Afternoon only

Presidents usually have little influence on the performance of the economy, but this may be less true since the 2016 election. How may the Trump administration’s policies be affecting the U.S. economy? Have there been—or may there yet be— cause-and-effect relationships between said policies and such variables as budget deficits, profits, investment, growth, employment, wages, trade, and the distribution of income? Reference will be made to available empirical evidence.

Afternoon Gatherings

3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Classes of 1953 & 1958

Service of Remembrance

4:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Cocktail Reception at the Alumni Art Exhibit

5:30 - 6:45 p.m.

Dinners

7 - 9 p.m.

  • 25th Reunion Dinner with President Cristle Collins Judd
    for the class of 1993
  • Alumni Barbeque under the Tent
    for all other classes

Cabaret

9:30 - 10:30 p.m.

Screening of The Princess Bride Under the Tent

11 p.m.


Saturday, June 9

Registration in the Siegel Center

8 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Saturday Morning Exercise

8:15 - 9:15 a.m.

  • Yoga with Mare Hieronimus MFA ’05
  • Fun Run with Michael Sapienza ’03 & Joshua Gannon ’03
  • SLC Fit: A Reunion Boot Camp

Barbara Walters Campus Center Information Session

9:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Saturday Morning Session

9:45 - 11:30 a.m.

  • Annual Alumni Association Meeting
  • Reunion Lecture: To be announced
  • Q&A with President Judd

Citation & Westlands Awards Luncheon

Noon - 1:45 p.m.

Citation Awards will be presented for Achievement and Service to the College. Westlands Awards will be presented to Reunion classes for fundraising achievements.

Reunion Terrace Reception

2 - 2:30 p.m.

Guests will gather for a champagne reception to celebrate the generous contributions of Reunion classes as they are inducted into the Reunion Terrace at Westlands.

Class Activities

2:30 - 5 p.m.

Each class will gather for an event planned by the Reunion volunteers. Locations on campus to be announced.

Athletics Reception & Wine Tasting

5 - 6 p.m.

Class of 1968 50th Reunion Dinner

6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Cocktails, Dinner & Dancing Under the Tent

for all other classes

6:30 p.m. - Midnight

Midnight Breakfast

Midnight


Sunday, June 10

Champagne Brunch

9 - 11:30 a.m.


General Information

Alumni Art Exhibit

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Lower Level

  • Friday: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Saturday: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Learn more

Archives

College Archives staff will be stationed at the registration room in the Siegel Center to display archival materials and answer your questions.

  • Friday & Saturday: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Campus Tours

  • Friday: 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. & 5 – 6 p.m.
  • Saturday: 4 – 5 p.m.

Bookstore Hours

  • Friday & Saturday: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Sunday: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Campbell Sports Center

  • Thursday: 7 a.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Friday: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Saturday: 8:15 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sunday: Noon – 5 p.m.

Open Swim Hours

  • Thursday & Friday: 8 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
  • Saturday & Sunday: Noon - 2:30 p.m.

Esther Raushenbush Library

  • Friday & Saturday: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.